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The Cricket Bag!

A STORY OF A LONG LOST CRICKET BAG.

Once upon a time there was a cricketer called Jack Mason, he played for Kent and England, in the late 1800’s. He was selected for the Ashes tour in 1897/1898, he played in all the 5 matches in that tour, and then returned to play for his native county Kent. He completed the ‘double’ in 1901, and his cricketing days got fewer. Jack got married in 1906 and promised his wife that when he finished playing he would pack all his kit, from the Australlian tour, into his tour bag and put it in the loft, and leave it untouched for their first son.

Mason never had a son. In the 1960’s one of his daughters decided to sell the dusty old bag. Roger Mann of Torquay, an avid cricket memorabilia collector was the recipient. He knew the item was genuine as he had a photo of Mason and the bag, with W.G.Grace changing for a game.

In 2004, Roger had a call from Masons grandson who was researching his Grandfathers life, he was writing a book called the ‘Test of Time’, the first chapter was called ‘The Cricket Bag’

Since then the bag sat in Rogers cricket memorabilia room, and was deteriorating, the leather had badly dried out, the stitching rotted, and was collapsing under the weight of the metal clasps……………..it had come to the end of it’s life……….or so Roger thought!!!!!!!!!!

121 years after the bag was made, Roger contacted me at Devon Leather Care, we discussed what could be done to rejuvenate the leather, we agreed that the provenance of the piece should be kept intact, no ‘new pieces’ installed. The stitching was repaired and the leather re-hydrated and a protective finish applied. The end result was vey pleasing, that an old sporting statesman can proudly live on.


 

 

 

Jack Mason's Bag. First Introduction, sorry state of age related use.
Jack Mason’s Bag.
First Introduction, sorry state of age related use.

 

First Inspections.
First Inspections. Stitching rotted and sides collapsing
First Inspections
First Inspections. Badly de-hydrated

 

DSCN1084
Rotted stitching collapsed under weight of metal top rungs.
The end Result!
The end Result!